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Unread 12-29-2011, 07:10 AM   #1
Scott561
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Question New Luger owner requesting help...

Hello.
I am a new member to this forum so please forgive me if I ask questions that are obvious to most.

My father has just passed his Luger on to me after having it since the 1970's. He had purchased it from my uncle whom I have little contact with now. The story is that it was taken from a dead tank commander during WWII by his father. I have coveted the gun for many years now and am not interested in selling it or anything as it is primarily a sentimental link to my father. I would however like to have some idea of value for insurance purposes. The main purpose of my inquiry to you is to learn more about the history of the pistol.

I have tried to uncover some information about it by purchasing a book (Standard Catalog of Luger – Aaron Davis) and by reading comments on this forum, but to be honest I am coming away more confused than anything. I am having difficulty pinning down an exact model using the book’s trees as it comes close to some models but not quite right.

• The toggle is marked as a DWM but the year seems to be 1941 which confuses me.
• There seems to be a bird type stamp on the toggle section that seems to differ a bit from the other images I have seen.
• The gun appears to be in great condition with most of it's bluing intact.
• The serial numbers all seem to match (to the point that I have been courageous enough to disassemble it) although there seems to be a different number on the trigger.
• The wooden grips appear original and have the last two numbers of the serial number stamped into them.
• The extractor has the word GELADEN stamped into the left side.
• There is a holster and two magazines for the gun. One of the magazines (shown) has what appears to be a plastic bottom. My father will be sending the holster and the wooden bottomed magazine soon.

I am including several photos with this post. My father is a professional photographer so the nice image with the holster is his while the others are my amateurish efforts.

I would greatly appreciate any knowledge you might be able to provide to me regarding my new weapon.

Thank you
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Unread 12-29-2011, 08:25 AM   #2
Norme
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Hi Scott, Welcome to the forum! Your Luger appears to have been assembled from two very different guns. The lower half and toggle train from a WW1 DWM, the receiver, barrel firing pin and magazine from a 1941 Mauser. Can you post a clear photo of any markings on the right side of the receiver? The holster looks very interesting, it may be a cut down Imperial Navy. I'd love to see a photo of the back and the cleaning rod sheath. Regards, Norm
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Unread 12-29-2011, 08:42 AM   #3
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The top flap of the holster appears to be a replacement/later addition, as it lacks the curved, concave ends, which would have protected the pistol from dust and dirt. The profile is very flat.
I also agree that the pistol is made up of parts from two different eras, which happen to have the same serial number.
The barrel is also a concern, as the serial numbers are stamped more hap haphazardly than usual. There is no bore guage nor a noticeable witness mark.
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Unread 12-29-2011, 12:59 PM   #4
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I want to thank you both for your rapid response. I am unfamiliar how to “thank” you officially yet so if you let me know how to do that I will add to your tallies.
I am a bit saddened to hear that my suspicions were correct regarding my Luger. My Dad has babied this weapon for a few decades now thinking that it was an all original weapon. He would be heartbroken to learn that it is made up of two separate guns. I think I will keep that bit of knowledge to myself. He has always felt that this was the heirloom he would pass down to his kids. That fact still makes it precious to me.
Is there a possibility that this gun was “officially” rebuilt from spare parts by a military gunsmith or some scenario like that? The gun seems to function well. We have fired it on occasion in the past and I don’t recall there being any issues. I have heard that Lugers that have been cobbled together from different parts can be temperamental. Might there be any validity to this idea?
To address your questions:
I do not yet have the holster or wooden bottom magazine in my possession yet. Dad was quite paranoid about theft during the transfer between gun shops and decided to send them separately. Once it arrives I will certainly post pictures for you.
I cannot locate any marks of any kind on the right side of the weapon. That was one of the things that piqued my suspicions. There is a small stamp of some sort on the right side of the trigger that I can’t get a real clear picture of with my point and click camera.
Alanint: You say that the barrel is a concern. Do you mean safety wise or other?
Lastly… what would you guess that the value would be for this gun. Again, it is more for insurance purposes than anything. The thought that my Dad wanted to pass it on to me means more to me than anything else.
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Unread 12-29-2011, 01:37 PM   #5
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Scott:
The gun "is what it is" and was assembled as such for some reason, sometime. The fact that collectors, some 70 years later, are less enthused, should not take away from your family treasure. Cherish it and enjoy!
dju
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Unread 12-29-2011, 02:18 PM   #6
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Since it's made from a mix of parts, it would be considered a "shooter" grade Luger.

For that reason, you won't lose value should a part have to be replaced in the future. Go ahead and enjoy shooting it if it's in good mechanical condition.

Most shooter grade Lugers sell for between $600 and $1000.

Marc
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Unread 12-29-2011, 02:51 PM   #7
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Since your father gave it to you consider it priceless regardless of what it is. Actual value or originality is meaninless. Bill
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Unread 12-29-2011, 03:33 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your knowledge and help.
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Unread 01-06-2012, 10:04 PM   #9
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Great looking gun and a nice story behind it too!! You have a real treasure there!
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Unread 01-08-2012, 04:43 AM   #10
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My first Luger is a completely mismatching pistol made from parts coming from a DWM 1916 P.08, an Imperial Navy and a sideplate from a third gun. And on the top of that it was reblued. However, it was a gift from my father, the cornerstone of my collection. In this sense, as said above, is priceless.

Enjoy your Luger and welcome to the forum!

Douglas
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